Worship in the Melting Pot – Dr Peter Masters

WORSHIP IS TRULY in the melting pot. A new style of praise has swept into evangelical life, shaking to the foundations traditional concepts and attitudes. The style of worship followed throughout the entire history of Bible-believing churches has been shunted on to the sidelines — and why not? Young friends are asking — ‘What’s the matter with contemporary music groups? Isn’t there every kind of instrument, including percussion, in the Psalms? Didn’t they dance in worship in Bible times? Isn’t God the same yesterday, today and for ever? Why should we be tied to gloomy Victorian culture in our praise to God?’…continue to read intro here.

(Lecture 1 of 3)

(Lecture 2 of 3)

(Lecture 3 of 3)

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Papal fallibility – The Lord’s prayer

Pilgrim’s Progress revisited - Christiana on the narrow way


This is so sad and such a concern that I’m not going to add my own comment, except to say, watch and pray!

Matthew 6:9-13

akjv

9 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. 10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. 11 Give us this day our daily bread. 12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.  13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. 

Luke 11:1-4

1 And it came to pass, that, as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples. 2 And he said unto them, When ye pray, say, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name…

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Book on Artistic Depiction of Mesopotamian Deities Available Online in PDF — Dr. Michael Heiser

This looks interesting!

Talmidimblogging

Tallay Ornan’s important book, The triumph of the symbol: Pictorial representation of deities in Mesopotamia and the biblical image ban, is now available as a PDF for free download. Here’s the abstract: This book analyzes the history of Mesopotamian imagery from the mid-second to mid-first millennium BCE. It demonstrates that in spite of rich textual evidence,…

via Book on Artistic Depiction of Mesopotamian Deities Available Online in PDF — Dr. Michael Heiser

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Irenaeus of Lyons – An apt saying and some sound instruction

Pilgrim’s Progress revisited - Christiana on the narrow way


Job 34:3

NKJV

For the ear tests words
As the palate tastes food.


“For it is not needful – to use a common proverb – that one should drink up the ocean who wishes to learn that its water is salt.”

Irenaeus, Against Heresies 2


“Error, indeed, is never set forth in its naked deformity, lest, being thus exposed, it should at once be detected. But it is craftily decked out in an attractive dress, so as, by its outward form, to make it appear to the inexperienced (ridiculous as the expression may seem) more true than the truth itself.”

Irenaeus, Against Heresies (Book I, Preface)


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The season of images – representations of Jesus

Pilgrim’s Progress revisited - Christiana on the narrow way


Exodus 20:4-6

“You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.  You shall not bow down to them or serve them, for I the Lord your God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and the fourth generation of those who hate me, but showing steadfast love to thousands of those who love me and keep my commandments.


Setting aside the issue of celebrating Christmas for now, I want to look at the evidence against images of the Lord, whether they’re representations of Him as an adult, child, or infant, because it is really all the same thing. The article from Pulpit & Pen motivated me to post about this once again. During this season this issue is especially important. 

Philippians…

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The Mixed Linen of Star Wars

This is an old article but the lesson can apply to a Christian’s celebration of X Mass and Easter. It is not a small thing nor is it a matter of Christian liberty but, rather, a matter of obedience. Please take God seriously!

Back before I was saved, I decided I was going to read the Bible from start to finish. My husband at the time had a Bible, but he hadn’t read much of it. I picked it up one day and started at Genesis. Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, half way through Numbers. I was done. I didn’t understand any of it and I thought it was a stupid book. There were things in Leviticus, in particular, that set me off. I didn’t know why they called it Leviticus, but I thought they should have named it Ridiculous. It all seemed downright silly to me. Why would God care if the people wore one kind of fabric with another kind of fabric? In Leviticus 19:19, it says, “You shall not let your livestock breed with another kind. You shall not sow your field with mixed seed. Nor shall a garment of mixed linen and wool come upon you.”

Years ago, I didn’t understand. Today, it makes complete sense. In this law, God was telling His people that they were to be set apart from the surrounding pagan nations. God is holy; He is pure. It was God’s desire that His people understand His holiness and purity. Therefore, in all that the people would do, the LORD would have them be reminded of His holiness and purity. From their livestock, to their fields, to their clothing, God was continually reminding them not to mix the holy with the unholy, the pure with the impure. As a people, they were not to mix with the surrounding pagan nations and in their lives before a holy God, they were to remember God’s holiness in all that they did.

Read the rest of the short article here.