But what about the children?

This page is for those who are concerned about the children missing out on a celebration they love. I have no expertise in how to answer this one except to say that Jesus did tell us we must love Him more than our own family:

Matthew 10:36-38, “And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.”

In this page’s comment thread I ask you, my readers, to share youir experiences with removing X Mass from your family’s celebrations. Children need to know the truth, too. I’ve heard from a few who have said their children really didn’t mind not celebrating the “holy” day. One parent even said that it was his kids that wanted to stop it because it was wrong to do. You have my appreciation for your contributions!

7 responses to “But what about the children?

  1. The Duty of Seeking the Things Which Are Jesus Christ’s http://gracegems.org/24/Black_seeking_the_things.htm

    FTA: Here, then, brethren, is the test of the sincerity of our love to Christ — a test which he himself requires as indispensably necessary to the character of his disciples (Matt. 10:37). He who loves father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he who loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. And again, in still stronger terms (Luke 14:26), If any man comes to me, and hates not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, and his own life also–he cannot be my disciple. The meaning of both these passages is the same. They evidently refer to the ‘supreme affection of the soul’, and to that decided preference which the things of Jesus Christ ought to have in our minds above our own things. Our Lord, in the words just now recited, cannot be supposed to require us absolutely to hate our brethren and kinsmen according to the flesh (for this would be as contrary to the plainest principles of piety, as to the common dictates of humanity), but, in a comparative view, we are commanded to act as if we hated them, so as to be willing to renounce our dearest friends, when duty to Christ demands such a sacrifice — that is, when we must either forsake them, or forsake our blessed Lord.

    (Do we love pagan/papist traditions of men and/or our children more than Christ?)

    Liked by 2 people

  2. FTA: If someone wants to create some religiously significant time with their family as it is dictated in the Bible, there is no sin there. If, for example, a father wants to use the month of July each year to teach his family a four week teaching on the cross of Christ, he should do it. It could become a family tradition to do so. If a mother wanted to teach her children about the Holy Spirit in November, then by all means, she should do so. Christians, however, should be cautious to “equate” what is done at home with what the church will wrongly give a “stamp of approval” for during the season of “Christ-mas”. In other words, “Jesus is the reason for the Season” is just a load of sentimental bunk. Jesus Christ is not only Lord of the season, but He is Lord of every day and every minute of every day, and, in fact, upholds everything in every moment and is the One in whom “we live and move and have our being” every day of the year. His incarnation extends to every moment of every time in the monumental significance of human and creative redemption. The incarnation is not just for December 25th, July 8th or March 12th, dates that have absolutely no religious significance whatsoever, unless they fall on the Lord’s Day and are, in fact, observed as the Lord’s Day. Christians must be careful about how they use something lawful and good at a time when it can be misconstrued. The incarnation is lawful, good and theologically necessary for salvation. But December may be a “cliché” month to visit that topic. One may measure their bondage to that cliché by their ability or non-ability to use ANOTHER month to teach their family about the incarnation. Reader, could you celebrate the meanings that you hold in Christ-mas in, say, August, or February? If not, you may be more bound to the secularization of Romanism than you may be willing to believe.

    http://www.apuritansmind.com/puritan-worship/christmas-and-the-regulative-principle/

    Liked by 1 person

  3. FTA: Professing Christian, faith is to forsake all fleshly value and kin, to be born of Another, eternal life to win. Repentance is a hating of your life because faith reveals the vanity and gross enmity of fleshly life. Jesus said to the “great multitudes” in Luke 14:25-26, “If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.” Men love these morally neutral things at the expense and transgression of righteousness. Christ was never seeking unity of family, prosperity, or even comfort at the expense of righteousness. It is no coincidence that Xmas has taken these morally neutral things and often made them the pinnacle importance in Xmas. The family is said to be the chief concern for those who celebrate Xmas. They say it is just about the family, and if you cease from celebrating Xmas you are forsaking the most important family time of the year. Even the family is a snare to following Christ. All that consists of your life as an unconverted, once-born man is a snare. The gospel is best given by the invitation of the cross, all mankind sharing in Jesus’ crucifixion. Again I say, Xmas is anti-cross and therefore anti-Christ. Any spirituality that is totally ignorant of these truths or any celebration that is not congruent with them is no day of worship to God. Xmas conveniently strengthens the bands that must be broken. Naturally all of society gravitates in this same effort for the world is Satan’s Kingdom.

    Source: http://www.xmasexposed.com/chapter-iii.html

    Liked by 1 person

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