What is Legalism?

I see many Christians using this word toward Christians who obey God’s holy Word where they, the accusers, think there is liberty in a certain matter.  So, maybe this will help clear things up for those who use this terminolgy, even if you think you are right to use it.

From: Are You Legalistic? Legalism, Grace, and the Motivation for Obedience  By Dr. Robert G. Spinney

I. Were the Puritans Legalistic?

For several years I served as a professor at a conservative Christian college in the Chicago area. Perhaps ninety percent of my students had been reared in Christian homes and went to what we would call conservative, evangelical, Bible-believing churches. This always made for interesting classes. Although most of my classes were in American history, if I was quick on my feet, I could get into meaty spiritual issues, regardless of what subject I was teaching.

Indeed I recall one day in a U.S. history class where we were studying the Puritans. My students had read Edmund Morgan’s The Puritan Dilemma, a delightful biography of John Winthrop that discussed the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the 1620s. This book talked about the Puritans coming to America, their first years in North America, and their attempt to establish a Christian commonwealth.

It was an amazing story. This collection of godly men and women, most of whom were deeply committed to the Word of God, left families behind in Europe to come to an unknown and undeveloped America. That meant that they arrived in a wilderness with no politicians, no states, and no economy. They had to build a community from scratch. For the Puritans, this errand into the wilderness was a holy experiment.

So my students read this book about the Puritans.

If nothing else, what the Puritans tried to do was admirable. They tried to be serious about this holy experiment; they tried to apply the Word of God to every aspect of life.

I could tell during our class discussion, however, that even though my students had read this biography, and even though the book gave a favorable portrayal of the Puritans, my students did not share my love for the Puritans. They didn’t like these guys. They wouldn’t come out and say it, but you could tell that they weren’t regarding the Puritans as their spiritual heroes.

At some point in the discussion I stopped, and I asked my students, “Was there something wrong with the Puritans? You all seem kind of reserved, as if you don’t like these guys.” My students were silent. Finally one of my students, one of my brightest students, said, “Well, you know, the Puritans were . . er, . . . they were legalistic.”

I said, “They were legalistic?”

He answered, “Yeah, they were legalistic.”

I looked at my students and said, “Do you all agree with that? How many of the rest of you think that the Puritans were legalistic?”

Almost every hand went up.

So I went to the chalkboard, and I wrote down the word legalistic. Then I asked my class, “Would someone define that word for me, please.”

Silence.

So I waited. Finally I baited them. “Just give me an idea; just get us started. What does that word mean; what does legalism mean?”

No one said a word.

I continued, “How many people have ever used the word legalism before?”

All the hands went up.

I asked, “Do you guys think the Puritans were legalistic?”

Again all the hands went up.

“Can you tell me what it means?”

No definitions were offered.

Finally my one student, my bright student, said with much hesitation, “Well, they were just like, er, so concerned with obeying God all the time.”

As he spoke, you could tell he realized that this wasn’t a very good definition.

I asked, “Isn’t it good to obey God all the time? What’s wrong with obedience?”

Silence. Nobody said anything.

Pointing again to the word I had written on the blackboard, I again asked, “Can anybody define this word?”

Let me tell you about my students. Even though this was a conservative Christian college, the students never used the word eschatology, they never used the word justification, and they rarely used the word sanctification. But they could deploy the word legalism at the right moments; they knew that word.

Finally after a long period of silence, my good student, my bright student, said, “I think you’ve convinced us that we really don’t know what that word means.”

I suspect that this situation is not unusual. Legalism and legalistic are words that we Christians use with reckless abandon. Yet I’m not sure that we can define this word accurately. In fact, I am fully confident that if I were to pass out index cards and ask the men here in our church to define the word legalism, we would get at least ten different definitions. But that doesn’t stop us from using the word. We use the word all the time, as if we knew what it meant, and as if we all meant the same thing when we used it.

I think this is a bad assumption. I don’t think the students in my classroom were that unusual at all. I think they were a typical representation of conservative, evangelical, Bible- believing Christians in America. We are not sure what legalism is, despite our frequent use of the term.

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Jimmy Swaggart and the Cross

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11 Timothy 3:1 and 3:13, warn  “…that in the latter days perilous times shall come” and “… evil men and seducers shall wax worse, deceiving, and being deceived.” 

In 1997, Jimmy Swaggart boldly claimed that the Lord had given him a new revelation of the cross.  As the Gospel is everlasting, there cannot be any new revelations given to the Church.  Therefore, Jimmy Swaggart’s  claim is in total opposition to the Word of God.      

“Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints.”  Jude 1:3. 

“Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever.”  Hebrews 13:8. 

Furthermore, Jimmy Swaggart’s cross is not the cross of Christ. 

Many have voiced concern as to the strange white outlined “crosses” on the red carpet in Family…

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“Today’s Update: Moloch at the Colosseum”

I ONCE WAS LOST

Today’s Update: Moloch at the Colosseum

If you visit the Colosseum in Rome, where thousands of Christians were martyred, you will pass at the entrance an enormousimage of Moloch, the gruesome Canaanite deity that demanded the sacrifice of infants and small children.

The idol, modeled after a depiction in the classic silent filmCabiria, is part of anexhibit on ancient Carthage, where Moloch was worshiped.Many conservative Catholics and Christians in general are unnerved by the presence of the idol on what they consider sacred ground. The Colosseum, the stadium where Rome staged its gladiator fights and other entertainments (including the torture of Christians) is owned and operatedby the Vatican, which must have given permission for the exhibit and the installation.

The controversy over the Moloch image has become tied to another controversy over the use of an Amazonian fertility idol to the goddessPachamamain a series ofceremonies,including one at the Vatican gardens…

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“Christians and Christ’s Intention” ❤️

I ONCE WAS LOST

Today’s Update: Christians and Christ’s Intention

The true Christian was intended by Christ to prove all things by the Word of God: all churches, all ministers, all teaching, all preaching, all doctrines, all sermons, all writings, all opinions, all practices. These are his marching orders. Prove all by the Word of God; measure all by the measure of the Bible; compare all with the standard of the Bible; weigh all in the balances of the Bible; examine all by the light of the Bible; test all in the crucible of the Bible. That which cannot abide the fire of the Bible, reject, refuse, repudiate, and cast away. This is the flag which he nailed to the mast. May it never be lowered!



—John Wycliffe (c.1320s– 31 December 1384, English scholastic philosopher, theologian, biblical translator, reformer, minister, and professor at the University of Oxford. He was an influential dissident within…

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The New Gnostics in Today’s Church

Kenneth Copeland, the Word Faith preacher, is certainly one of today’s Gnostics. Here is a sampling of some of his teachings:

Every prophet that walked the face of the earth under the Abrahamic covenant could have paid the price if it were a physical death only. When He said “It is finished” on that cross, He was not speaking of the plan of redemption. The plan of redemption had just begun; there were still three days and three nights to be gone through.2

The Spirit of God spoke to me and He said, “Son, realize this. Now follow me in this and don’t let your tradition trip you up.” He said, “Think this way—a twice-born man whipped Satan in his own domain.” And I threw my Bible down . . . like that. I said, “What?” He said, “A born-again man defeated Satan, the firstborn of many brethren defeated him.” He said, “You are the very image, the very copy of that one.” I said, “Goodness, gracious sakes alive!” And I began to see what had gone on in there, and I said, “Well now you don’t mean, you couldn’t dare mean, that I could have done the same thing?” He said, “Oh yeah, if you’d had the knowledge of the Word of God that He did, you could have done the same thing, ’cause you’re a reborn man too.”3

What blasphemy! A whole generation of Christians has been swept away and corrupted on the deepest level by accepting this man’s unbiblical teachings.

From Lighthouse Trails