Charles Haddon Spurgeon on Christmas

The following excerpt is from C. H. Spurgeon’s Treasury of David, on Psalm 81, verse 4.

Ver. 4. For this was a statute for Israel, and a law of the God of Jacob. It was a precept binding upon all the tribes that a sacred season should be set apart to commemorate the Lord’s mercy; and truly it was but the Lord’s due, he had a right and a claim to such special homage. When it can be proved that the observance of Christmas, Whitsuntide, and other Popish festivals was ever instituted by a divine statute, we also will attend to them, but not till then. It is as much our duty to reject the traditions of men, as to observe the ordinances of the Lord. We ask concerning every rite and rubric, “Is this a law of the God of Jacob?” and if it be not clearly so, it is of no authority with us, who walk in Christian liberty.
http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps081.htm

We have no superstitious regard for times and seasons. Certainly we do not believe in the present ecclesiastical arrangement called Christmas. First, because we do not believe in the mass at all, but abhor it, whether it be sung in Latin or in English. Secondly, because we find no Scriptural warrant whatever for observing any day as the birthday of the Savior; and consequently, its observance is a superstition, because not of divine authority. Superstition has fixed most positively the day of our Savior’s birth, although there is no possibility of discovering when it occurred. … It was not till the middle of the third century that any part of the Church celebrated the nativity of our Lord; and it was not till very long after the Western Church had set the example, that the Eastern adopted it. … Probably the fact is that the “holy” days were arranged to fit in with the heathen festivals. We venture to assert, that if there be any day in the year, of which we may be pretty sure that it was not the day on which the Savior was born, it is the 25th of December. … Regarding not the day, let us, nevertheless, give God thanks for the gift of His dear Son.
http://www.spurgeon.org/sermons/1026.htm

THIS is the season of the year when, whether we wish it or not, we are compelled to think of the birth of Christ. I hold it to be one of the greatest absurdities under heaven to think that there is any religion in keeping Christmas-day. There are no probabilities whatever that our Saviour Jesus Christ was born on that day, and the observance of it is purely of Popish origin; doubtless those who are Catholics have a right to hallow it, but I do not see how consistent Protestants can account it in the least sacred.
(The Incarnation and Birth of Christ, December 23rd, 1855)
http://www.spurgeon.org/sermons/0057.htm

Source (from the comment line)

Unfortunately, there are those who would consider Spurgeon a supporter of celebrating the pagan/papist helliday due to his Christmas sermons. Charles Spurgeon may have exploited the time of year for the sake of the Gospel’s spread (such as Paul did on Mar’s Hill exploiting the “Unknown God” of the pagans) but it does not appear to me that he was one who would have set up all of the pagan accroutements (evergreens indoors)  or practiced any of the superstitions like the burning of the Yule log and collecting its ashes to ward of evil spirits, or the hanging of the mistletoe, within his home or church.  In fact, he condemned such things as superstitions.

However, I wish there were ten or a dozen Christmas-days in the year; for there is work enough in the world, and a little more rest would not hurt labouring people. Christmas-day is really a boon to us; particularly as it enables us to assemble round the family hearth and meet our friends once more. Still, although we do not fall exactly in the track of other people, I see no harm in thinking of the incarnation and birth of the Lord Jesus. We do not wish to be classed with those

“Who with more care keep holiday
The wrong, than others the right way.”

The old Puritans made a parade of work on Christmas-day, just to show that they protested against the observance of it. But we believe they entered that protest so completely, that we are willing, as their descendants, to take the good accidentally conferred by the day, and leave its superstitions to the superstitious. http://www.blueletterbible.org/Comm/spurgeon_charles/sermons/0057.cfm

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